Arkansas
Military Veterans'
Hall of Fame

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Arkansas
Military Veterans'
Hall of Fame

Chief Petty Officer Adam Lee Brown | Arkansas Military Veterans' Hall of Fame

Chief Petty Officer Adam Lee Brown

Chief Petty Officer Brown, deceased (Killed in Action), Hot Springs, U.S. Navy, Iraq (two tours), Afghanistan (two tours), Awards include the Silver Star Medal for Gallantry in Action, the Bronze Star Medal with valor, the Purple Heart Medal, the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, and three Navy Achievement Medals.

Adam Brown enlisted in the US Navy on July 24th 1998. Initially trained as an interior Communications electrician. He's set his sights on becoming a Navy SEAL. At the age of 25 he was the oldest of 145 recruits to enter the first training phase, basic underwater demolition in Carando, California. He also became one of the few dozen, 173 days later to graduate in May 2000.  Assigned to Seal Team Four Adam Brown went through advanced tactical training while in Virginia Beach Virginia. His job was to carry the platoon M60 machine gun and ammo. With his pack, he was hefting 80 lb. He was part of a SEAL operation of 2500 Fighters divided into nine teams capable of operating in all environments, from Desert to Arctic Tundra. He then shifted to Seal Team Two, Central and South American task force unit, requiring six more months of training. A training accident damaged his right eye and required him to stay in combat support, gathering intelligence when he deployed to Iraq in April 2004. Returning home Brown adapted to his handicap by learning to shoot left-handed at Sniper School in Carando, and graduated in April 2005. Soon his unit was in Afghanistan where a Humvee crushed and severed most of his fingers of his right hand. After recovery he learned to use his left hand to shoot a pistol, a tougher task than firing a sniper rifle. Even though he was handicapped, he's set his sights on SEAL Team Six the premier counter terrorism unit. After the Navy turn down Brown's SEAL application multiple times, the service finally let him into training--with no special consideration. For 6 months, Brown learned to swivel as head so he could achieve near perfect scores shooting with his left hand and using his good eye to sweep a room. He graduated in November 2006 and was promoted to Chief Petty Officer. in October 2008, Brown returned to the Kunar Valley, but not just to fight. He had a personal project distributing 500 pairs of shoes to Afghan children. His teammates saw his compassion as an extension of his spirituality as Brown even expressed regret about those he had killed. On the night of February 17th 2010 Brown headed out with this team to go after a Taliban leader codenamed Objective Lake James.  It was during this mission Brown was awarded the Silver Star; the orders read as follows: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity and action against the enemy as an assault team member for a Joint Task Force in support of operation enduring freedom on 17th March 2010. Chief Brown served as part of an assault force that executed a daring raid deep into mountainous enemy occupied terrain in northeastern Afghanistan. 2 barricaded enemy fighters open fire from the target building into assault force personnel and non-combatants, while numerous enemy fighters simultaneously engage the force from the surrounding mountains. Reacting immediately, without regard for his own safety, Chief Brown engaged two of the fighters from his position and boldly maneuvered towards the enemy under intense small-arms fire, thus providing life-saving cover for his trapped team mates and non-combatants. The mortally wounded, Chief Brown continued to engage and communicate the location of the enemy fighters. His heroic actions under withering enemy fire change the tide of the battle and inspired those around him to courageously eliminate the remaining enemy fighters. This aggressive operation resulted in the elimination of the targeted Taliban Commander and four fighters following an intense 2-hour firefight. By his bold initiative, undaunted courage, and complete dedication to do to you, Chief Petty Officer Brown reflected great credit upon himself and upon the highest traditions the United States Naval Service. His wounds were too much to overcome and Chief Petty Officer Brown died as a result of his injuries in this mission.

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